1976 Superior 54XL Restoration Log

Jean-Marc Dugas

PCS Member
Operation Rear bumper continues. This evening I was able to remove the driver's side rear bumper. Not knowing what I was doing it took about 2 hours. Hopefully, the other half will come off a little quicker.

The inside of the bumper does not look too bad, but I will still clean it and paint it the same as I did with the ends. The metal bracket that holds the tail lights is getting rusty, so this may be the excuse I needed to get one of those benchtop sandblasting cabinets....

Talking about sandblasting, would it be safe to use one of those gravity-fed sandblasting guns to clean the inside of the bumper before painting it?

10 - Rear Bumper Removal 1.jpg
10 - Rear Bumper Removal 02.jpg10 - Rear Bumper Removal 03.jpg10 - Rear Bumper Removal 04.jpg10 - Rear Bumper Removal 05.jpg
 

John ED Renstrom

PCS Member - Elected Director 2019-2022
Super Site Supporter
Not unless you want to double tape them. Same with a blast cabinet. The best way is to get a tub and one of the rust removers and just cover them with it. Put a lid over it to slow down the evaporation. It will not bother the chrome but will remove any rust. Both sides. Then prime and paint.
 

Jean-Marc Dugas

PCS Member
This evening I removed the center plate as well as the passenger side rear bumper section. Now that I have done it once on the driver's side this took me only about 1/2 hour instead of 2.

I think that I will be taking the bumpers to the welding shop to have the far-end brackets reinforced. I was able to drive the screwdriver right through the rusted metal. The good news is that the rust is only affecting the brackets, so no work on the bumper itself needs to be done. Both pieces are soaking in degreaser overnight and I will apply some rust converter tomorrow and hopefully have them to the welding shop early next week.

11 - Rear Bumper Removed 01.jpg11 - Rear Bumper Rust Hole 01.jpg11 - Rear Bumper Rust Hole 02.jpg11 - Rear Bumper Rust Hole 03.jpg11 - Rear Bumper Rust Hole 04.jpg11 - Rear Bumper Degreaser 01.jpg
 

Jean-Marc Dugas

PCS Member
Very slow week restoration-wise, but I may have a lead on that bumper center piece. Hopefully, it will work out. I lost out on getting my hands on an FW Model #29 Roll In All Level Ambulance Cot manufactured in 1981. Another one will pop up somewhere eventually.

The design of the car with the canceled rear side windows really makes it sound like a tin can. I applied butyl sound deadener sheets to the 3 canceled windows. Hopefully, that will make a difference with the sound level in the back of the car.

12 - Sound Deadening 02.jpg12 - Sound Deadening 01.jpg12 - Sound Deadening 02.jpg12 - Sound Deadening 01.jpg
 

Jean-Marc Dugas

PCS Member
Yesterday I was planning on reinstalling all of the trim on the doors s on top of the quarter panels. Well, I decided not to do the driver and passenger doors yet since I will most likely need to replace the felt beltline weatherstrip. Something else to source.

I noticed a dent on the trim that goes on the top of the spare tire door. Fixing this took a few hours, so only the driver side trim (minus the drivers door was installed).

13 - Driver Side Trim 01.jpg13 - Driver Side Trim 02.jpg

Today was a little colder, so I decided not to work on the passenger side trim because I want the sealer I use to flow in the cracks as well as possible, so I decided to tackle the shoreline. I took the faceplate to Kent (our local version of Home Depot) to get a 20 Amp electrical socket and plug. It is not the same exact pin pattern as the original, but it will have to do.

I may put some caulking on the inside between the electrical box and the quarter panel It looks like this is a pretty big gap where water come in.

Finally, I tested the inverter by turning it on with the engine running for about 15 minutes. I do not have a proper multimeter for 120 volts, but I was able to confirm that there were no shorts, that power was reaching the shoreline socket, and all of this without the inverter catching on fire or smoking. The inverter gets turned on / off via two push-button switches located in the center console beside the siren. All seems to work as intended.

13 - Inverter 03.jpg13 - Inverter 004.jpg13 - Inverter 05.jpg13 - Inverter Remote Switch 01.jpg13 - Shore Line Receptacle 02.jpg13 - Shore Line Receptacle 03.jpg13 - Shore Line Receptacle 04.jpg13 - Shore Line Receptacle 05.jpg
 

Paul Steinberg

Administrator
Staff member
Super Site Supporter
An L6-20 receptacle is a 220-volt and 20 amp. What was the original receptacle and can you possibly post a picture of it? I wouldn't want to be working outside with a 220-volt 20 amp system unless it was protected with a ground fault device. Even a 110-volt system can give you a heck of a shock. If you are standing on any dampness you will be the grounding rod to earth. Voltage doesn't kill, but amperage definitely will. I would be more inclined to add a ground fault circuit breaker to the car if you are planning on having it operational.
 

John ED Renstrom

PCS Member - Elected Director 2019-2022
Super Site Supporter
That would be a twist lock reciver. For power out. Shore power would be a male plug for power in. The inverter only converts 12 volts dc in to 120 volts ac out. Those with shore normaly had a inverter to drop 120 to 12 DC to power things in the rig and charge battries when parked.
 

Jean-Marc Dugas

PCS Member
That would be a twist lock reciver. For power out. Shore power would be a male plug for power in. The inverter only converts 12 volts dc in to 120 volts ac out. Those with shore normaly had a inverter to drop 120 to 12 DC to power things in the rig and charge battries when parkeMy mistaked.
My mistake. Not a shoreline, but power out. I find it odd that it does not have a shoreline to charge the car batteries and medical equipment.
 

Paul Steinberg

Administrator
Staff member
Super Site Supporter
The reason that it took so long to polish the rocker moldings is that they were flash chromed when manufactured. The chrome does dull after years, and the only way to get a shine back is to remove the chrome and polish the stainless steel. Stainless steel will oxidize with time, so make sure to put a good layer of wax or ceramic coating on it to preserve the gloss that you have worked so long to recover.
 

Abe Bush

Moderator
My mistake. Not a shoreline, but power out. I find it odd that it does not have a shoreline to charge the car batteries and medical equipment.
The original owner must have been on a budget when checking boxes of the order form at their local Superior dealership back in 1975. Too bad their salesman wasn't able to talk them into it.
 
Top