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Old 12-19-2019, 03:21 AM
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Daniel Scully Daniel Scully is offline
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Default LT 1 Bleeder Screw

This replaces the stock bleeder screw by the thermostat. You can attach a hose to it ,and then run it into a container. With the stock bleeder screw it runs down on the distributor when you bleed the air out. Anything you can do to keep water / oil off of the distributor helps.

https://www.yourcustomcar.com/coolan...er-valve.html*
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Old 12-19-2019, 12:16 PM
Paul Steinberg Paul Steinberg is offline
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https://www.yourcustomcar.com/coolan...der-valve.html

This Coolant Bleeder Valve is what you need for your Chevrolet High Performance Vehicle if getting air out of your cooling system has ever been a problem, or even difficult for you to do.
The vehicles that this valve was intended for include, but are not limited to: Impala SS, Caprice, Firebird, Roadmaster, Corvette, Trans Am




  • Our 2-piece Coolant Bleeder vales feature 2 heavy duty rubber seals to prevent leaks from occurring.
  • Ridges on valve end for easy opening and closing of the valve with no tools required.
  • 1/8" NPT threads to directly replace your low-tech OE Bleeder Screw
  • A 10mm hex portion to tighten with a 10mm wrench.
  • No coolant loss when bleeding the coolant system
  • Our provided clear hose will allow you to see when ALL of the air has been removed from the coolant system.
The original coolant air bleeder screw was a bad decision made by GM when they designed them for use in the water pump for your car. If you were to try to bleed air out of the original bleeder, coolant will go all over the top of the water pump and drip down to the top of your Optispark distributor! This would almost instantly corrode the terminals on the inside of the Optispark and ruin it ($400 mistake!). Save yourself Hundreds of dollars by preventing Optispark failure with our New & Improved coolant bleeder valve allows you to attach a hose and route coolant back into your coolant tank and not all over your Optispark Distributor!


Our Coolant Bleeder Valve is intended to be used on vehicles with LT4, LT1, L99, and L05 engines:

1992-1996 Chevrolet Corvette C4
1993-1997 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
1993-1997 Pontiac Firebird Formula and Trans Am
1994-1996 Buick Roadmaster
1994-1996 Cadillac Fleetwood
1994-1996 Chevrolet Caprice
1994-1996 Chevrolet Caprice Police Package
1994-1996 Chevrolet Impala SS
1994-1996 Chevrolet Caprice Wagon
1994-1996 Buick Roadmaster Wagon


These valves have 1/8" NPT male threads (which is a common thread size for coolant bleeder valves on many vehicles) THEY MAY WORK ON VEHICLES OTHER THAN WHAT'S LISTED ABOVE-Please make sure before placing your order.


All valves include 3ft of hose and ARP Thread sealant already applied!




These Installation instructions apply to installing ort coolant bleeder valve into any vehicle with a 1/8"npt thread coolant bleed port.

*Please note that in these instructions, you will see pictures of a modified LT1 Engine in my 1996 Chevrolet Impala SS, but the same instructions will work for your engine as well.


With your Engine completely cold, remove your Coolant tank cap to relieve and pressure in the cooling system (remember, it may not look like mine), then reinstall cap to prevent coolant loss after unscrewing your OE bleeder screw in the next step.





Next, with a rag handy just in case a few drops of coolant seep out, unscrew your factory brass bleeder screw located on the thermostat housing with a 10mm wrench and wipe off the hole.




Before shipping your new valve I have applied ARP Thread Sealer to the threads of the Coolant Bleeder Valve to insure a leak free installation.





Screw your new bleeder in a few turns by hand




Then tighten the bleeder with your 10mm wrench




Upon tightening make sure that the nipple ends up facing forward towards the front of the car




3ft of clear hose is included in your kit




Installation of the valve is complete. Now simply attach the supplied hose to the nipple. It just slides on, no clamp is needed thanks to the 3+ ribs on the nipple




Route the other end of the hose to your coolant reservoir/recovery tank.


In this picture, I am using an empty radiator fluid bottle. This is because I removed the inner fenders on my Impala, so I use a different style of coolant recovery tank


For demonstration purposes, I will use the yellow bottle to represent your vehicle's Original/stock coolant tank.




Next, you will need to close the coolant bleeder valve and start you engine. Allow your engine to reach operating temperature. With the engine running, and your clear hose still attached to both the bleeder and recovery tank, slowly open the bleeder valve about 1 full turn (don't unscrew the whole valve, just open it by loosening the top portion of the valve only). You will now see a lot more bubbles in your clear hose as the air and coolant is pushed through the hose. (see next 3 pictures and video)


Warning: Your Engine and coolant is now hot and you must take caution in protecting your hands, so throw on a set of gloves and safety glasses just to be safe. Don't open the valve all the way since the pressure could cause steam and or coolant to spray out of the hose at high temperatures!







213
Then pinch the tube shut and pull it off of the valve nipple.
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Old 12-19-2019, 12:17 PM
Paul Steinberg Paul Steinberg is offline
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Then pinch the tube shut and pull it off of the valve nipple.





You can then hold the pinched end up and let the remaining coolant drain into your coolant tank. Afterwards, there may be 1 little drop of coolant sitting at the tip of the nipple where the hose was attached. Simply take your rag and dab the tip to get that last drop of coolant off to finish up the coolant bleeding procedure. That's it! All done Thanks for purchasing and installing one of our Coolant Bleeder Valve kits


Only 18.99 with Free Shipping


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